The crescent and tree symbolize the defense of Charleston in 1776, shortly after the colony of South Carolina had declared its independence from England. The gorget is a valid guess because of similarity, but the upturned tips were where the chain was attached and placed around the neck. Stroup tells us that some people believe the crescent to be an homage to the gorget, a piece left over from the era when armor was in use. It, of course, remains the state's flag today. They really, really hate it. The word gorget means a piece of armor worn around the throat in battle. With the secession crisis of 1860-1861, these symbols are finally encoded as the official flag of the Republic of South Carolina after its secession from America in December, 1860. Your email address will not be published. From what I have found, there seems to be little doubt that it is the “gorget.” The motif was derived from the throat plate of the medieval knight in armor, and during the 18th century became popular with King George II as a military symbol worn around the necks of English officers. South Carolina's flag was ranked as the 10th best designed state or provincial flag in North America by the North American Vexillological Association in 2001. South Carolina Focus is a production of South Carolina Public Radio. It is still kept at the Historical Society of Iowa, which should be willing to give back the property of a sister state (after all Iowa, wasn’t the Union “preserved” by those troops?) S.C. lawmakers need a little longer to figure out what South Carolina’s state flag should look like. South Carolina State Flag Simplistic Proposal. -- Dr. Eric Emerson, Director and State Historic Preservation Officer the S.C. Department of Archives and History. Two state historians say it sure looks like one, but according to the flag's creator, that may not have been what he had in mind. The first option is that it is a gorget, which was the crescent worn on the caps of the South Carolina revolutionary soldiers. This version is actually what most people believe. Many people call it a moon but is it really? He quotes Moultrie's diary, which says the design is simply a crescent, which is fellow historian Eric Emerson's view. ... Stroup tells us that some people believe the crescent to be an homage to the gorget, a piece left over from the era when armor was in use. And it's ancient origins are in a moon. Governor by King George in 1755, and who personally designed the uniforms of a newly-reorganized South Carolina militia in 1760, adding the gorget symbol to their caps. Created by Col. William Moultrie, the flag features a palmetto tree, which became a beloved icon of the state. But a lot of people will tell you that it’s not a moon at all, but a crescent-shaped piece of armor worn across the throat called a “ gorget.” Colonial and Revolutionary War Flags 3. The military blue and the crescent-shaped chest plate (called a gorget) are from the Revolutionary War uniforms and were used on the Liberty Flag, one of the oldest flags in the United States, which is from South Carolina. There is much debate as to what the crescent in the upper left corner was originally meant to symbolize. Crescent is Gorget. Some confusion has been caused by the fact that the crescent on the state flag was tilted in the 1890’s to resemble the moon. South Carolina is widely acknowledged to have one of the most beautiful state flags in the country. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War, William Moultrie was commissioned to design a flag to signal South Carolina … The canton contains a white crescent (gorget). Although intended as a temporary signal flag, the design stuck. But a lot of people will tell you that it’s not a moon at all– but a crescent-shaped piece of armor worn across the throat called a “ gorget.” Some argue that the gorget symbol was worn on the hats of soldiers as a way of paying tribute to the days of wearing body armor. (Source: South Carolina State Flag Study Committee) The color looked right. Fortunately, one of the original flgas (and perhaps THE original state flag) still exists from the 1860’s. On South Carolina's 230th birthday, learn the Revolutionary War history behind the state flag. The crescent and tree symbolize the defense of Charleston in 1776, shortly after the colony of South Carolina had declared its independence from England. Then there's the gorget argument. 1860’s Flag. In 1775, Colonel William Moultrie was asked by the Revolutionary Council of Safety to design a flag for the South Carolina troops to use during the American Revolutionary War.Moultrie's design had the blue of the militia's uniforms and a crescent taken from their cap insignia. But what about that crescent shape in the corner? War Flags 2. By Ed Mitchell. The state flag of South Carolina features a crescent in the upper left quadrant which now resembles a crescent moon, but which some historians have suggested may have once represented a gorget. Moultrie called it a Crescent. A gorget for an officer of the South Carolina Infantry Regiment The crescent, positioned over in the top left corner , seems to welcome the comparison of a moon shining over a palmetto tree . It was first flown at Fort Johnson.. Over the past fifteen years, I have seen many, many organizations in South Carolina refer to the crescent on the state flag as having been a depiction of a "gorget," a relic of medieval neck armor that, by the time of the American Revolution, had evolved into an officer's symbol of rank. tours@charlestonfootprints.com. (original post)Moultrie designed the flag. Although the crescent is recognized to be a symbol of the troops and not the moon, some disagreement persists as to its origin. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War, William Moultrie was commissioned to design a flag to signal South Carolina troops. Colonel William Moultrie designed the crescent flag on blue because it was the same color as the soldier’s uniforms during the Revolutionary War in 1775. U.S. It is a a piece of body armor worn by knights of old, appropriate for a jousting tournament. The palmetto tree is a much more known symbol in the state today than the crescent. The state flag derives from a flag designed by Colonel William Moultriein 1775 with a blue ground and crescent based on the uniforms of the Second South Carolina Regiment, who wore a crescent with the tips pointing up on their hats. The canton consists a white color crescent (gorget). A gorget for an officer of the South Carolina Infantry Regiment The crescent, positioned over in the top left corner , seems to welcome the comparison of a moon shining over a palmetto tree . Your email address will not be published. But, as Stroup points out, a glance at the dictionary definition of "crescent" tells one that a crescent is a quarter, or three-quarter, moon. 2013. About 100 years later when South Carolina seceded from the union, the people of the state wanted a new flag … This chain of evidence far outweighs anything that can be offered in opposition to this theory, and why I firmly stand by the research that proves the crescent comes from the gorget. One of South Carolina’s staunch loyalists was William Bull, who was named Lt. S.C. Colonial/Rev. The other choice seems to make a lot of sense too, though. In fact, South Carolina hasn’t had an official flag for 80 years. SC was became the eighth state in the United states on May 23, 1788. But that tree…well, if you look at this image and then scroll up to the cover image for this post, you’ll see a difference. The Crescent on South Carolina's Flag: Is it a Moon or Not? Greg Biggs, 26 July 2007 People routinely call it a moon, which Emerson understands, but doesn’t technically agree with. The flag of the U.S. state of South Carolina has existed in some form since 1775, being based on one of the first Revolutionary War flags. The crescent and tree … 3. South Carolina Public Radio News and Talk, South Carolina Public Radio News and Music. The crescent does resemble the necklace/ ornamental collar worn by … In the 2001 North American Vexillological Association (NAVA) flag survey of United States and Canada flags, the flag of South Carolina was ranked 10th out of 72. There is no obvious reason to place a throat protector on a cap. Name: The Palmetto State: Use: Civil and state flag: Adopted: January 28, 1861: Design: White color palmetto tree on an indigo background field. The flag of the state of South Carolina has, in some form, existed since 1775, being based on one of the first Revolutionary War flags. South Carolina’s new flag design seemed like a fine idea — right up until everyone actually saw it. Thus far, no offering from Iowa, so the old flag remains in limbo. Bull Family Crest. The moon shape mark is … Crescent is Gorget Posted on May 14, 2011 ... South Carolina’s “palmetto flag” was officially made the state banner in 1861. The proposed 2020 official South Carolina state flag design. The reason for the redesign is that there is no official state flag. Liberty at Bottom - Wrong! The design under consideration (bottom) was brought forth by a panel of historians. Any resemblance to Islamic symbolism in our state flag is coincidence - there was no Islamic influence whatsoever in its design. South Carolina’s “palmetto flag” was officially made the state banner in 1861. Historian Rodger Stroup says flag originated with Col. William Moultrie, who took the blue of his soldiers' coats and the crescent shape from their hats to fashion a signal to let the city of Charleston know if and when the British were coming during the Battle of Sullivan's Island prior to the Revolutionary War. Moultrie Flag. A gorget, which debuted on medieval battlefields to protect the wearer’s throat, is actually what is represented on the South Carolina state flag—not a crescent moon. But a lot of people will tell you that it’s not a moon at all, but a crescent-shaped piece of armor worn across the throat called a “ gorget.” 843-478-4718 Most Medieval versions of gorgets were simple circular neck protectors that were worn under the breastplate and backplate set. The crescent, which they insist is not a moon, was angled the right way. No LibertySee also: 1. Either a moon crescent, or a "difference" crescent have a more valid association with the history of the flag. The word gorget means a piece of armor worn around the throat in battle. Ironically, this flag was stolen from the state capitol in Columbia in 1865 by Iowa troops under Sherman, who burned and ransacked that city. He took the blue from the soldier’s uniform and the crescent … The South Carolina flag features a white palmetto tree centered on a field of indigo with a white crescent in the upper left. Historical flags 4. Last modified: 2015-04-25 by rick wyattKeywords: united states | moultrie | south carolina | Links: FOTW homepage |search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors image by Randy Young, 31 January 2001 1. "Gorget Distilling’s name has a unique tie to both South Carolina and the birth of our country as a nation. United States of America Troops wearing the crescent symbol on their caps built a fort of palmetto logs overlooking the city’s harbor entrance on Sullivan’s Island, and their famous victory over the British on June 28, 1776 was largely attributed to the soft palmetto core that absorbed and smothered English cannonballs. The exact nature of the crescent which adorns the corner of the South Carolina state flag has been the subject of debate for years. These neck plates supported the weight of the plate armour worn over it, and many were equipped with straps for attaching the heavier armour plates. As it turns out, people hate it. "There's just some myths in history that just have legs and keep going on and on...it does, it looks like a moon. Is it a moon, as many people say? South Carolina officially adopted the flag with palmetto and crescent in January 1861, shortly after it seceded from the Union. South Carolina 5. But that's not the way that we know Moultrie viewed it." This large banner features a crescent straight up and down in the manner of the gorget. It looks familiar with its indigo background and crescent in the upper left corner. Both men say they don't mind if people call it a moon (as if they could stop it), but more important is the history the symbol represents. Through the 19th century, the crescent on the state flag also appeared wit… Description 2. Historian Rodger Stroup says flag originated with Col. William Moultrie, who took the blue of his soldiers' coats and the crescent shape from their hats to fashion a signal to let the city of Charleston know if and when the British were coming during the Battle of Sullivan's Island prior to the Revolutionary War. Moultrie is credited with designing a crescent flag as a symbol of his troops in 1775, and he later wrote that it conformed to the crescent symbol worn on their caps. Bull’s own family crescent includes the gorget symbol and it was he who commissioned William Moultrie as an officer of the 2nd South Carolina regiment. Required fields are marked *, Charleston Footprints Surprising but true. Moultrie called it a Crescent. | South Carolina Focus. This illustration of a medieval gorget in no way resembles the crescent found on the state flag. South Carolina’s “palmetto flag” was officially made the state banner in 1861.

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